If sitting is standard for you, especially at work, see what kinds of solutions to a sedentary lifestyle your workplace may offer.

Stephanie Mader
Medcor Advocate

According to JustStand.org, the average person spends as much as 12 hours a day sitting. If you take that number and then factor in the National Sleep Foundation’s recommended adult minimum of 7 hours of sleep each night, that doesn’t add up to a lot time each day that you move your body and do healthful physical activity.

If sitting is standard for you, especially at work, see what kinds of solutions to a sedentary lifestyle your workplace may offer.

If sitting is standard for you, especially at work, see what kinds of solutions to a sedentary lifestyle your workplace may offer. For example, your employer may promote wellness breaks, times in the workday when you can take a walk or participate in group stretch breaks with your colleagues. Your employer may also have standing desks available, so you have an option other than sitting at your desk.

Additionally, your employer may have opportunities for incorporating more physical activity into your day outside of the office. See if gym membership discounts are available through your employer or if they offer rebates on things like fitness tracker bracelets or exercise apps.

Having someone hold you accountable for how much physical activity you put in to your day is helpful too. Your employer may be able to connect you with a health coach to get your movement on track. You may also turn to your co-workers for ideas and support; perhaps you can join them on a recreational sports team or have them accompany you on walks during your lunchbreak.

Still looking for other ideas to move more throughout your workweek? Consider standing during conference calls, taking the longest route to the bathroom, using the stairs, parking on the far side of the lot, and “deskercising.”

The benefits of regular exercise and physical activity are numerous, and even small additions to your daily routine can make a significant difference. Be sure to consult your primary care provider before beginning an exercise regimen, especially if you have a chronic health condition.

This article is not intended to diagnose or treat any condition or to give medical advice. Always consult your primary care provider for healthcare instructions. External links are provided as references and do not indicate an endorsement by Medcor. External links are subject to other sites’ terms of use and privacy policies.